Skip Nav
Hair
Not to Be Dramatic or Anything, but Coral-Coloured Hair Is the Coolest Trend We've Ever Seen
Nails
This New Negative Space Nail Trend Will Inspire Your Next Manicure
Superdrug
These 13 Concealers Get Amazing Reviews, and They're All Under £10 at Superdrug
Hairstyles
The Prettiest Hairstyles to Wear to a Wedding (That Won't Draw Attention Away From the Bride)
Morphe
Morphe Launched 60 Shades of Foundation — This Is What They Look Like

Should You Put Toothpaste on Spots?

Should You Put Toothpaste on a Spot? A Definitive Answer

I've had to deal with acne for most of my life and, as a result, have pretty much heard and tried it all. One controversial "tip" that is very often passed on is to apply toothpaste on spots and let it dry over night. Even my mum suggested I try it during my teenage years! I always refused — surely toothpaste was never meant to be used on anything but teeth?

Recently, this subject became a talking point between my friends, and as no one seemed to have a definitive answer, I decided to take the matter into my own hands. I went to Dr. Sharkar from Sönd Skin and asked her two simple questions: does it work and, perhaps most importantly, is it good for the skin? Unsurprisingly, the answers were "kind of" and "definitely not."

According to Dr Sharkar, "Although toothpaste will dry out your pimple, it may also leave you with dry, irritated, flaky, and peeling red skin." It's important to know that most generic toothpastes contain ingredients such as baking soda, hydrogen peroxide, alcohol, menthol, and calcium carbonate, which will irritate your skin and might even burn it, depending on how long you leave the toothpaste on. Besides, as she rightly pointed out to me, many people are already seeking out more natural or gentle alternatives to commercial toothpaste, and "if it's not good enough for brushing our teeth, why would it be good enough for treating our spots?"

ADVERTISEMENT

So, now that we know that we should not put toothpaste on our spots, what should we do instead? Treating acne isn't easy, and what works for some people won't necessarily work for you. That being said, there are things you could do to make your skin look better, like reducing your consumption of dairy, double cleansing, drinking more water, and changing your pillowcases. Dr Sharkar also recommends using "products that contain benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid" (which can reduce redness and speed healing), or even essential oils such as tea tree or lavender oil. But most importantly, remember to be kind to your skin, and get rid of those harsh products that do nothing but aggravate the situation. After all, we only have one face — and if you treat it like the enemy, it will fight you back.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Diggy Lloyd
Product Credit: Tibi Top, Rodebjer Jeans
Latest Beauty
All the Latest From Ryan Reynolds